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Translational Neuroscience

Modules

Compulsory modules

Identification number 03-TN-BPSY        
Learning Outcomes Students who have successfully completed the module will have acquired insights into current theories, models and concepts from biopsychological approaches to basic psychological functions.
Specifically, students will
• show knowledge and understanding of the structures and functions of the human nervous system (including the brain) that are relevant to the study of psychological processes and functions as well as to the understanding of psychological disorders
• demonstrate key intellectual skills by critically evaluating the role of physiology in human behaviour, emotion, and cognition
• compare and contrast the contributions made by the different approaches and research methods that are used in Biological Psychology
• critically read scientific publications in the field of Biological Psychology
• demonstrate writing and reading skills to present and interpret material with evidence of the use of relevant literature
• demonstrate the ability to communicate critically and to engage in critical thinking.
 
       
Contents main topics Contents main topics:
Biopsychological theories and models of basic psychological functions
• emotion and motivation
• learning and memory
• attention and orientation
• perception
• cognitive processes
• action control
Basic biopsychological theories and models for psychological disorders
 
       
Teaching methods Lecture, Seminar        
Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Paul Pauli, pauli@psychologie.uni-wuerzburg.de
Prof. Dr. Matthias Gamer, matthias.gamer@psychologie.uni-wuerzburg.de
       
Participating faculty Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology I, Experimental Clinical Psychology        

Identification number 03-TN-NB        
Learning Outcomes Students who successfully completed this module will have acquired insights into current theoretical concepts in neurobiology. The students will examine clinical aspects of neurobiology with a focus on the molecular, cellular, physiological, and systemic mechanisms. Additionally, they will have learned how to evaluate and present data in oral form. Furthermore, the students will learn to critically read scientific publications in the field of neurobiology and will be taught in the ability to extract relevant information from the original literature.        
Skills & Methods Critical reading, evaluation and presentation of original literature, establishing of a deep understanding of theoretical aspects in neurobiology by extracting results, the underlying experiments, and the modern interpretation from scientific work        
Contents main topics In the lecture, students will get a theoretical introduction into the neurobiology and clinical neurobiology:
• introduction to neuron and glia, ion channels and membrane potential
• ion channelopathies, synapses, transmitter release, NMJ, Myasthenia gravis, cerebellum, basal ganglia, ataxia and Morbus Parkinson
• somatosensory system, touch, pain, schizophrenia and autism and disorders , disorders of cognition, muscle and muscle diseases, anatomy and function of the motor system, spinal reflexes, motoneuron diseases, hippocampus, learning and memory, anterograde amnesia, visual agnosia cortex and the limbic system, emotions , disorders of conscious and unconscious mental processes, attention, smell and taste and hearing , sleep, EEG, epilepsy, vision and diseases of the visual system, the autonomous system The literature seminar bases on fundamental literature of lecture-relevant topics to document the experiments underlying our present knowledge in neurobiology
       
Teaching methods Lecture, Seminar        
Module coordinator Prof. Dr. M. Sendtner, Sendtner_M@klinik.ukw.de
 
       
Participating faculty University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute for Clinical Neurobiology Prof. Dr. M. Sendtner, Prof. Dr. P. Tovote, PD Dr. R.Blum, PD Dr. S. Jablonka, Prof. Dr. C. Villmann        

Identification number 03-TN-NN        
Learning Outcomes Students who successfully completed this module will have acquired insights into the current molecular and cellular pathophysiology of diseases prevalent in neurology and neurosurgery. They will understand basic mechanisms of disease in the motor and sensory system and of higher functions. They will understand about brain trauma and brain tumour biology. They will know about animal models for neurological and neurosurgical diseases and will be introduced into behavioural, neurophysiological, morphological and molecular biological analysis methods. They will have learnt how to raise appropriate bed-to-bench research questions and how to devise study plans. They will learn how to read scientific publications critically and how to extract the relevant data bringing them forward in their own project. In addition, they will have learnt how to record and analyse data and how to present them in oral and written form        
Contents main topics • antibody-associated CNS-diseases: experimental analysis of auto-antibody function
• stem cell based models of movement disorders
• molecular brain imaging in movement disorders
• lessons on nociceptor function learned from pain genetics
• neurophysiology of hearing in tumour and trauma
• neuroimmunology: pathophysiology of Multiple sclerosis and Myasthenia gravis
• subarachnoid haemorrhage: pathophysiology and neuroprotection
• pathophysiology of brain trauma "Experimental brain trauma models and their analysis
• neuroplasticity after CNS damage by brain tumours
• connectomics in neurology
• genetically caused neurologic disorders: Ataxias and dystonia
• the molecular basis of myopathies
• the molecular basis of glioma-biology
• animal models: rattus norvegicus, mus musculus, primary neuronal cultures
       
Teaching methods Lecture, Seminar        
Module coordinator Dr. Lorenz Müller, mueller_l5@ukw.de
 
       
Participating faculty University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Neurology: Prof. Dr. J. Volkmann, Prof. Dr. C. Sommer, Prof. Dr. I.U. Isaias, Dr. P. Capetian, Prof. Dr. N. Üçeyler, PD Dr. Dr. K. Boelmans, Prof. Dr. G. Stoll, Dr. M.M. Reich, PD Dr. K. Doppler, Dr. L. Müller Department of Neurosurgery: Prof. Dr. R.I. Ernestus, Prof. Dr. A.-L. Sirén, Prof. Dr. C. Matthies, Dr. S. Rückriegel, Dr. T. Linsenmann, Prof. Dr. T. Westermaier        

Identification number 03-TN-PSYT        
Learning Outcomes Students who successfully completed this module will have gained an overview of the characteristics of diverse psychiatric disorders. They will have acquired insights into the neurobiological basis of the etiopathogenesis of these disorders (e.g. which neurotransmitter systems and brain regions are involved), how they are treated in addition to current concepts and experimental approaches studying these psychiatric disorders. They will have learned (at least theoretically) how molecular biology methods, e.g. genotyping or gene expression analysis, or various methods studying the neuronal plasticity in the brain are used to reveal neurobiological correlates of certain psychiatric disorders and/or the efficacy of pharmacotherapy. Furthermore, the students will learn to critically read scientific publications in the field of neurobiology/neuropsychiatry.        
Skills & Methods The methodogical approaches include molecularbiological methods such as various genotyping techniques, gene expression techniques (including methods studying epigenetic modifications), imaging techniques (including human brain imaging techniques) as well as knowledge about behavioural tests.        
Contents main topics • basic knowledge about the characteristics of various psychiatric disorders, the proposed neurobiological basis (e.g. gene by environment interaction) as well as the treatment options of: anxiety disorders, depression (uni-polar, bi-polar), schizophrenia, ADHD, dementia (Alzheimer`s disease), Parkinson`s disease
• brain regions and neurotransmitter systems involved in neuronal networks involved in experiencing anxiety and fear, attentional networks, learning and memory, their importance for emotionality in humans.
• analysis of gene variants and their association with various psychiatric disorders and behavioural traits animal models for psychiatric disorders
• gene by environment interaction neuroadaptive mechanisms as a result of stress exposure during different periods of lifetime resilience, epistatic load hypothesis, mis-match hypothesis
• anatomical, cellular/neuronal plasticity at selected brain regions, e.g. hippocampus and amygdala
• human brain imaging
 
       
Teaching methods Lecture, Seminar        
Module coordinator Prof. Grit Hein, Hein_G@ukw.de
 
       
Participating faculty University of Wuerzburg, Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatic and Psychotherapy Prof. Deckert, Prof. Herrmann, PD Dr. Menke, PD Dr. Lauer, Dr. Polak, Dr. Nagy, Dr. Hommers, Dr. Weber, Dr. Scherf-Clavel        

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Elective modules

General elective modules

Identification number 03-TN-CN        
Learning Outcomes Students who successfully completed this module will have acquired insights into current experimental approaches in neurobiology. They will be introduced in preparations and recording techniques to study the function and pathomechanisms of neural models systems. The students will examine clinical aspects of neurobiology with a focus on the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms. Additionally, they will have learned how to document their own data that were collected during lab courses. Furthermore, the students will learn to critically reflect their data in the context of the experimental methods used        
Skills & Methods Modern neurobiological methods include ultrastructural analysis, immunhistochemistry, microscopy and imaging techniques, behavioural analysis, cell and molecular biology, electrophysiological recording techniques, primary cultures of neural cells, digital documentation of image material        
Contents main topics • structure, function, and molecular functional components of the peripheral nervs of the nervous system including its neuronal and non-neuronal cells as well as the neuromuscular endplate (model system mouse)
• motor behavioral tests in mouse models for motoneuron diseases functional and morphological analysis of motoneurons and motor endplates
• neural stem cells: characteristics, approaches for therapeutic strategies
• anatomical, cellular/neuronal plasticity at selected brain structures, e.g. hippocampus and cerebellum (mouse model)
• immunhistochemistry/immunfluorescence in hippocampal/cerebellar slices, confocal microscopy
• primäry neuron preparations of dorsal root ganglia and hippocampal neurons, mouse perfusion
• whole cell patch clamp recordings to determine ion channel properties
• Model animals: mus musculus, primary neuronal cultures
       
Teaching methods Lectures, Intensive hands-on lab work        
Module coordinator Prof. Dr. M. Sendtner, Sendtner_M@klinik.ukw.de
 
       
Participating faculty Participating faculty: University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute for Clinical Neurobiology Prof. Dr. M. Sendtner, Prof. Dr. P. Tovote, PD Dr. R.Blum, PD Dr. S. Jablonka, Prof. Dr. C. Villmann        

Identification number 03-TN-EPHY        
Learning Outcomes This module will give a first insight into the analysis of electrophysiological data. You will gather hands-on experience in analysing multi-electrode and ECoG recordings (animal) as well as EEG/ MEG recordings (humans). The methods introduced can build a bridge from spikes to ERPs (event related potentials) which makes them especially interesting in the light of a translational approach. One focus will lie on oscillatory components, which seem to play a crucial role in low-level as well as higher-level cognitive functions        
Skills & Methods Processing of invasive and non-invasive electrophysiological data from human and animal subjects        
Contents main topics • basics of electrophysiological signals
• electrophysiological recording techniques shared in animal and human research
• time-frequency analysis
• localization and multiple-comparison problem in human non-invasive data
       
Teaching methods Lecture, hands on training in the analysis of electrophysiological data        
Module coordinator Dr. B. Haendel, barbara.haendel@uni-wuerzburg.de
 
       
Participating faculty University of Wuerzburg, Department of Psychology (III)        

Identification number 03-TN-EP        
Learning Outcomes Students who successfully completed this module will have acquired insights into current concepts and experimental approaches in Psychiatry and especially in the neurobiological basis of the etiopathogenesis and the treatment of psychiatric disorders. They will be trained in molecularbiolgy methods, e.g. genotyping, gene expression analysis, and in various methods studying structural neuronal plasticity of the brain. Additionally, they will have learned how to evaluate and present data in oral and written form that were collected during the lab course. Furthermore, the students will learn to critically read scientific publications in the field of neurobiology/neuropsychiatry        
Skills & Methods The methodogical approaches include molecularbiological methods such as various genotyping techniques, gene expression techniques (including methods studying epigenetic modifications), imaging techniques including immunhistochemistry and neuronal reconstructions) knowledge about behavioural tests and their ability to picture various behavioural traits human brain imaging techniques (Hermann)        
Contents main topics • brain regions and neurotransmitter systems involved in neuronal networks involved in experiencing anxiety and fear, attentional networks, learning and memory, and their importance for emotionality in humans

• analysis of gene variants and their association with various psychiatric disorders and behavioural traits Animal models for psychiatric disorders

• gene x environment interaction neuroadaptive mechanisms as a result of stress exposure during different periods of lifetime resilience, epistatic load hypothesis, mismatch hypothesis

• anatomical, cellular/neuronal plasticity at selected brain regions, e.g. hippocampus and amygdala Adult neurogenesis immunhistochemistry/immunfluorescence using forebrain slices neuronal reconstructions using the Neurolucida software

• human brain imaging

• Model animals: mus musculus
 
       
Teaching methods Seminar, intensive hands-on lab work        
Module coordinator PD Dr. Schmitt-Böhrer, schmitt_a3@ukw.de
 
       
Participating faculty University hospital Wuerzburg, Clinic and Polyclinic for Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy Prof. Deckert, Prof. Lesch, PD Dr. Herrman, PD Dr. Schmitt-Böhrer, Dr. Rivero, Dr. Weber        

Identification number 03-TN-IC        
Learning Outcomes Students who successfully completed this module will have acquired distinct knowledge on various families of ion channels and their importance for brain physiology. The student will have learned in a bottom up approach to put the molecular findings into the context of pathomechanisms in various kinds of channelopathies. They will be trained in recording techniques to study ion channel properties on transfected/injected cell lines/oocytes as well as primary murine neurons. Additionally, they will have trained to critically read, reflect, and present scientific reports in the field of channel physiology        
Skills & Methods The physiological approaches include patch clamp recordings and two electrode-voltage clamp recordings in various cell systems        
Contents main topics • physiological properties of membranes
• structure-function relationships of ligand-gated and voltage-gated ion channels
• regulation and pharmacology of ion channels
• anatomical expression profiles, developmental regulation, evolution of ion channels
• sensory systems, ion channelopathies
• cLabs/Neuron to simulate various electrophysiological conditions, whole cell patch clamp recordings to determine ion channel properties
• model animals: cell lines primary neuronal cultures from mouse brain
 
       
Teaching methods Lecture, Seminar, intensive hands-on lab work        
Module coordinator Prof. Dr. C. Villmann, villmann_C@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de
 
       
Participating faculty University Hospital Wuerzburg, Institute for Clinical Neurobiology        

Identification number 03-TN-NI        
Learning Outcomes Students who successfully completed this module will have acquired solid insights into basic and disease-relevant aspects of neuroimmunology and neuroinflammation        
Skills & Methods Critical reading, evaluation and presentation of original literature, establishing of a deep understanding of of theoretical aspects in regeneration in the nervous system, including underlying experiments and techniques, and the interpretation of scientific work        
Contents main topics • introduction into neural cells and structures relevant for neuroinflammation (glial cells, myelin, myelin molecules, synapses, nodes of Ranvier)
• components of the innate immune system I: macrophages and microglial cells
• components of the innate immune system II: dendritic cells, NK cells, granulocytes antigen presentation lymphatic organs
• components of the adaptive immune system: lymphocytes and antigen recognition
• the phenomenon of tolerance and autoimmunity
• experimental models for neuroinflammation (EAE, Cuprizone, EAN) the BBB
• clinics, pathogenesis and therapy of multiple sclerosis
• role of inflammation in primarily neurological/neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer disease inherited neuropathies)
       
Teaching methods Lecture        
Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Rudolf Martini, rudolf.martini@uni-wuerzburg.de
 
       
Participating faculty University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Neurology Prof. Dr. Rudolf Martini, Prof. Dr. Manfred Lutz, Prof. Dr. Thomas Kerkau, PD Dr. Niklas Beyersdorf, Dr. Michael Schuhmann, PD Dr. Daniel Zeller        

Identification number 03-TN-P        
Learning Outcomes In this course, students will learn about the (patho-) physiology of pain, neuroanatomical structures and pain therapy including interdisciplinary multimodal pain therapy. These include molecular mechanism of pain, studying pain in animals and humans and drug development. Insights in pain examination in the clinical routine are given by demonstration of patients and in self-experience-based practical courses. “How to evaluate studies in pain” is worked-out by the students in a specific article/topic chosen by the student and presented within in a talk during the course.        
Skills & Methods Skills in paper evaluation, pain examination, molecular essays, literature study, oral presentation        
Contents main topics • pain pathophysiology
• model animals: rat and mice (methods course)
• clinical examination of patients with pain
• practical course in clinical and psychological examination
• multimodal pain therapy
       
Teaching methods Lecture, Seminar, Practice        
Module coordinator Prof. Dr. H. Rittner, Rittner_H@ukw.de
 
       
Participating faculty University Hospital Wuerzburg Prof. Dr. C. Sommer, Prof. Dr. N. Üçeyler, Prof. Dr. E. Wischmeyer Prof. Dr. A.Brack        

Identification number 03-TN-PN        
Learning Outcomes Students who successfully completed this module will have deeper insights into cellular and molecular components and mechanisms underlying regeneration in the nervous system. Particular emphasis is on preclinical and clinical approaches to improve regeneration, both in the peripheral and central nervous system. Additionally, due to the introduction of students into recent scientific publications, they will have learned how to evaluate and present data in oral form. All in all, the module is focussing on a vital and exciting topic of neuroscience with particular emphasis on integrating distinct disciplines of life science.        
Skills & Methods Critical reading, evaluation and presentation of original literature, establishing of a deep understanding of theoretical aspects in regeneration in the nervous system, including underlying experiments and techniques, and the interpretation of scientific work.        
Contents main topics PNS
• Schwann cells, inflammation and more: relevance for axonal regeneration after lesion (R. Martini)
• biomaterials, nanomedicine and 3D printing approaches for nerve repair (P. Dalton)
• regeneration in peripheral neuropathies: mechanisms and limitations (C. Sommer)
• established surgical interventions after peripheral nerve injury: chances and limitations (J. Pérez)
CNS
• Role of trophic trophic factors in the lesioned and diseased nervous system (M. Sendtner)
• Lower vertebrates: what can we learn from their regeneration capacities? (C. Lillesaar)
• CNS injury and growth inhibition (R. Martini)
• CNS trauma in higher vertebrates: mechanisms, recovery and limitations (A-L. Sirén)
 
       
Teaching methods Lecture, Seminar        
Module coordinator Prof. Dr. Rudolf Martini, rudolf.martini@uni-wuerzburg.de
 
       
Participating faculty University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Neurology        

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Elective internships

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Elective modules: section by Graduate School of Life Sciences GSLS

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